What are you reading now, playas?

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Left A Slide
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Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 8:43 am

Re: She is queen undisputed of mind beauty

Post by Left A Slide »

Unhurried Ways wrote:Reckless Daughter, a Biography of Joni Mitchell, by David Yaffe
I rarely read biographies of successful musicians, there so much else to learn (and so little time) and the stories are similar. But: I followed her music from the late 60s to the late 70s and she was a genius and I wanted to know how that happened.
She was a (baseball term) five-tool player: talented multi-instrumentalist, creative chord progressions and melodies, top-shelf lyrics, matched the words with the melodies. Her music (during that period) progressed from folk-oriented to jazz oriented, but always original.
For me, the author answered my question on why she was so inspired, with its roots as a young person and someone who had early struggles. One minor example, her middle school composition teacher graded her tougher than others and wouldn't let her get away with a cliche. One major example: she got through polio in a sanitarium (at 10 y.o.) w/o much help from her parents.
He is a fan, spent a lot of time with JM, but also interviewed lots of people to get a well-rounded version of events. She has a sharp eve and sharp tongue and can tell a good story. He knows music and can explain why a particular chord progression is so good. He also puts the music in perspective of what is happening in society and the music biz, and her personal life.
Check out some of the book reviews if you're interested, the Atlantic had a good one.
It's worth your time if you like her.

Nice. Thanks for the review, I always liked how she wasn't afraid to evolve.

Unhurried Ways
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She is queen undisputed of mind beauty

Post by Unhurried Ways »

Reckless Daughter, a Biography of Joni Mitchell, by David Yaffe
I rarely read biographies of successful musicians, there so much else to learn (and so little time) and the stories are similar. But: I followed her music from the late 60s to the late 70s and she was a genius and I wanted to know how that happened.
She was a (baseball term) five-tool player: talented multi-instrumentalist, creative chord progressions and melodies, top-shelf lyrics, matched the words with the melodies. Her music (during that period) progressed from folk-oriented to jazz oriented, but always original.
For me, the author answered my question on why she was so inspired, with its roots as a young person and someone who had early struggles. One minor example, her middle school composition teacher graded her tougher than others and wouldn't let her get away with a cliche. One major example: she got through polio in a sanitarium (at 10 y.o.) w/o much help from her parents.
He is a fan, spent a lot of time with JM, but also interviewed lots of people to get a well-rounded version of events. She has a sharp eve and sharp tongue and can tell a good story. He knows music and can explain why a particular chord progression is so good. He also puts the music in perspective of what is happening in society and the music biz, and her personal life.
Check out some of the book reviews if you're interested, the Atlantic had a good one.
It's worth your time if you like her.

jr29
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2013 5:12 am
Location: Memphis, Tn.

Post by jr29 »

KC.BBBS wrote:I aint no playa but I did just finish Robbie Robertson’s book, "Testimony" last evening. I enjoyed it a lot.

I read Levon Helm’s "This Wheel’s on Fire" about five years ago and came away feeling that Robertson was a bit of a back stabber, prima donna and more of a glory hound than the rest of the boys. "Testimony" might be Robertson’s way of setting the record straight but he gives due respect to Levon, Richard, Rick and Garth.

Anyway, I recommend the book to anyone who dug The Band. It’s written in a way that makes you feel you’re along for the ride, just off stage, lounging at Big Pink or in the front row taking in the group’s "The Last Waltz" concert in 1976.
I enjoyed the book too, but I can't say it changed my feelings about Robbie one way or another. He did give due respect to the other Band members but he also made quite a few less than flattering comments about Rick, Levon and Richard. Garth avoided similar comments. He also completely avoided/took the high road when it came to some of the accusations Levon made in his book.
He didn't really have kind things to say about Jesse Winchester either. I found that odd.
I don't remember him picking living targets for his negative comments. Maybe I'm reading too much into it and if I'm wrong about anything please refresh my memory. I read it right when it came out so it's been a bit.

Either way, I love the Band and I'll never stop listening to their music.

I'm currently reading "Jimmy Carter- A Full Life- Reflections At Ninety"

KC.BBBS
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 9:02 pm

Post by KC.BBBS »

I aint no playa but I did just finish Robbie Robertson’s book, "Testimony" last evening. I enjoyed it a lot.

I read Levon Helm’s "This Wheel’s on Fire" about five years ago and came away feeling that Robertson was a bit of a back stabber, prima donna and more of a glory hound than the rest of the boys. "Testimony" might be Robertson’s way of setting the record straight but he gives due respect to Levon, Richard, Rick and Garth.

Anyway, I recommend the book to anyone who dug The Band. It’s written in a way that makes you feel you’re along for the ride, just off stage, lounging at Big Pink or in the front row taking in the group’s "The Last Waltz" concert in 1976.

turpentim
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Post by turpentim »

pdg wrote:Image
THE. BEST. EVER.

Tim in the ATL

pdg
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Post by pdg »

Image

jr29
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Post by jr29 »

turpentim wrote:
jr29 wrote:I just finished Woe To Live On, a Civil War era novel set in western Missouri and eastern Kansas. The author, Daniel Woodrell, is a Missouri guy and sets most of his work in or around the Ozarks.

I'm now reading Hot Burritos- The True Story Of The Flying Burrito brothers.
He's also a fan (friend?) of Jay Farrar's. He lends some praise on the back of Farrar's memoir. He's also the author of 'Winter's Bone.' He's fantastic.

Tim in the ATL
I had never noticed that on the back of Jay's memoir.

And he is fantastic. I've read 5-6 of his books. He still lives in West Plains, Missouri. West Plains is an Ozark town way down in southern Missouri.

turpentim
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Post by turpentim »

jr29 wrote:I just finished Woe To Live On, a Civil War era novel set in western Missouri and eastern Kansas. The author, Daniel Woodrell, is a Missouri guy and sets most of his work in or around the Ozarks.

I'm now reading Hot Burritos- The True Story Of The Flying Burrito brothers.
He's also a fan (friend?) of Jay Farrar's. He lends some praise on the back of Farrar's memoir. He's also the author of 'Winter's Bone.' He's fantastic.

Tim in the ATL

jr29
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2013 5:12 am
Location: Memphis, Tn.

Post by jr29 »

I just finished Woe To Live On, a Civil War era novel set in western Missouri and eastern Kansas. The author, Daniel Woodrell, is a Missouri guy and sets most of his work in or around the Ozarks.

I'm now reading Hot Burritos- The True Story Of The Flying Burrito brothers.

criminals
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Post by criminals »

Had to go to P. 25 to find this thread so guess you guys haven't been reading, tsk tsk. Just read Andersonville by MacKinley Kantor. Incredible. A novel based on historical facts about the Civil War prison camp for the North in Andersonville, GA. Published in 1955 and won the Pulitzer Prize.

Initially interested due to my dad being retired and getting into his genealogy - his great great grandfather immigrated from England and fought in the Civil War, was captured, put in Andersonville and survived. 50,000 went through the prison, 14,000 perished. The author does an incredible job depicting actual events with fiction. Bonus points for several Chickamauga references. 760 smallish type pages. Highly recommended!

calexico
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Post by calexico »

Hoops wrote:Image

Cracking book there, ballsack.


I am currently reading Ben Watt's memoir called Romany and Tom.

half-n-half
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Post by half-n-half »

gdavis5446 wrote:
half-n-half wrote:Poetry books I picked up in Marfa.
Marfa nice! I used to live in Presidio county
Wow. Its really nice down there. Desertmountainawesomness Were you border patrol or what? #interested

gdavis5446
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Post by gdavis5446 »

half-n-half wrote:Poetry books I picked up in Marfa.
Marfa nice! I used to live in Presidio county

half-n-half
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Joined: Thu Jul 17, 2003 2:31 am

Post by half-n-half »

Poetry books I picked up in Marfa.

Hoops
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Post by Hoops »

Image

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